Saturday, April 9, 2011

The Value of an Educated Mind in a High-Tech World | Truthout

This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?
I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.
This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?

I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.

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This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?
I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.
This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?
I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.
This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?
I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.
This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?
I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.
This raises several questions. One is whether emphasizing education — even aside from the fact that a big rise in inequality has taken place among the highly educated — is, in effect, fighting the last war. Another is, how can we have a decent society if and when even highly educated workers can’t command a middle-class income?
I know, this is rushing ahead a bit. But remember, the Luddites weren’t the poorest of the poor; they were skilled artisans whose skills had suddenly been devalued by new technology.
The Value of an Educated Mind in a High-Tech World | Truthout

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